Archives for : August2013

Episode 13 – 2nd Peter 3:1-18

We laughed at the over-the-top reaction to the VMA debacle (more over the top than the performance?) and got around to finishing 2nd Peter.  Inquisition: Pastor talked about Lutheran confirmation practices; Thomas reminisced about meeting James White last weekend.

Episode 13 – 2nd Peter 3:1-18

Music:

“Rudie Can’t Fail” – The Clash
“View From Heaven” – Yellowcard
The Inquisition Song – Mel Brooks
“Spanish Bombs” – The Clash

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Sermon: Luke 10:23-37 (August 25th, 2013)

The Old Testament (2nd Chronicles 28:8-15), Epistle (Galatians 3:15-22), and Gospel (Luke 10:23-37) readings for the 13th Sunday after Trinity, followed by Pastor Eric Brown’s homily* on our Gospel text at Zion Lutheran, Lahoma, OK.

Sermon 4: Luke 10:23-37 (August 25th, 2013)

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*Text versions available at Pastor’s blog.

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A Link to the Post: God as the Third Rail of Rock & Roll

Rock-and-RollYour hosts spoke early on (very briefly) about the fact that we both enjoy so-called “secular” pop/rock music more than the contemporary Christian counterpart.  Maybe someday we’ll expand on our personal reasons for that, but for now we wanted to pass on this short interview with Billy Corgan of the Smashing Pumpkins (as dealt with on Denny Burk’s blog), in which he admits that “God is the third rail in rock and roll.”  He even goes on to say, “I think God’s the great, unexplored territory in rock and roll music.”

It’s an interesting interview (“Christian rock” does get a mention), and Denny Burk makes some good points in his comments too.  You can watch/read it HERE.

Episode 12 – 2nd Peter 2:10b-2:22

We continued 2nd Peter after some discussion on this past week’s sermon. Inquisition: Thomas talked about the different elements in play when discussing sin with unbelievers; Pastor talked about “Christian freedom” and made a book recommendation.

Episode 12 – 2nd Peter 2:10b-2:22

Music:

“Rudie Can’t Fail” – The Clash
“Free” – Train
The Inquisition Song – Mel Brooks
“Spanish Bombs” – The Clash

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A Link to the Post: Why the Early Church Didn’t Have the Prosperity Gospel

Here you have the comic we brought up during our Episode 12 program.  So true!

prosgosp

Sermon: Mark 7:31-37 (August 18th, 2013)

The Old Testament (Isaiah 29:17-24), Epistle (2nd Corinthians 3:4-11), and Gospel (Mark 7:31-37) readings for the 12th Sunday after Trinity, followed by Pastor Eric Brown’s homily* on our Gospel text at Zion Lutheran, Lahoma, OK.

Sermon 3: Mark 7:31-37 (August 18th, 2013)

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*Text versions available at Pastor’s blog.

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Episode 11 – 2nd Peter 1:13-2:10a

We continued through the book of 2nd Peter. Inquisition: Thomas talked about the “Myth of Neutrality”; Pastor dealt with what we might call “sanctified lying” – that is, why Rahab and the Hebrew midwives were not necessarily violating the 8th commandment.

Episode 11 – 2nd Peter 1:13-2:10a

Music:

“Rudie Can’t Fail” – The Clash
“Start the Machine” – Angels and Airwaves
The Inquisition Song – Mel Brooks
“Spanish Bombs” – The Clash

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A Link to the Post: The Myth of Neutrality

no_neutralityIf you listen to our most recent episode of the podcast (#11), you will hear me addressing the subject of the “Myth of Neutrality”.  What you will also hear is the reason why we normally try and record only one podcast episode per evening – namely the fact that my brain ends up giving me the raspberry and heading home without me sometime during the first segment of our second recording.  As a result, I find my answer during the “Inquisition” to barely be coherent.  But here’s where my self-consciousness means your gain: I’m doing this “Link to the Post” on the Myth of Neutrality, and providing you with some great resources to give you the scoop.

The first is a 49-minute lecture Dr. Greg Bahnsen did on the subject to a group of high-schoolers.  What this means is that the information presented is at a basic enough level for laymen (like myself) to understand; but don’t think for a minute it’s not challenging or worthwhile!

The Lecture

The second is a short article written on the subject by – as luck would have it – an atheist.  He doesn’t us the phrase, but he is very clear in denouncing the false objectivity of the secular left (and non-Christian materialists in general).  A must-read!

The Article

Sermon: Luke 18:9-14 (August 11th, 2013)

Pastor Brown’s homily* for the 11th Sunday after Trinity at Zion Lutheran Church in Lahoma, OK.  As Thomas was out of town last weekend, Pastor recorded the sermon with something other than our usual equipment.  The quality is not as good as the previous (and upcoming) sermons, but here it is nonetheless!

Sermon 2: Luke 18:9-14 (August 11th, 2013)

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*Text versions available at Pastor’s blog.

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Episode 10 – 2nd Peter 1:1-12

Began 2nd Peter with discussion about certain quirks of the text before getting in for 12 whole verses! Inquisition: Pastor talks about his 3 favorite Luther quotes, while Thomas deals with what he considers the most common mistake in Christian witnessing.

Episode 10 – 2nd Peter 1:1-1:12

Music: 

“Rudie Can’t Fail” – The Clash
“Casting Lines” – Jack’s Mannequin
The Inquisition Song – Mel Brooks
“Spanish Bombs” – The Clash

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A Link to the Post: Granville Sharp Rule

the_granville_sharp_ruleThis is the Link to the Post promised in Episode 10 on the Granville Sharp rule.  The link below provides further information in 2 pasts, one for laymen and one that is more technical.

Granville Sharp rule

A Link to the Post: The Septuagint

septuagintIn the most recent episode of Count Joy, I (Thomas) mentioned the Septuagint in talking about 1st Peter 5:4 (cf. Septuagint reading of Exodus 34:29-30, and 2nd Corinthians 3:7-11).  Since some of our listeners might not know what the Septuagint is, and since it is very important to New Testament studies, I did some searching for a good introduction of it.  There’s not much of brevity about it online, unfortunately, but I did locate the following short article:

The Septuagint  (for a longer, more exhaustive treatment, see here)

A few thoughts of my own for those who just want the barest-bones:

  • The Septuagint is the Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible (which we call the Old Testament)
  • The name means “seventy” and is sometimes abbreviated as LXX.   This is because according to legend the initial round of translation (which was limited to the Pentateuch, the first 5 books of the Bible) was done by approximately 70 (or 72, or 75, accounts vary) Jewish scholars
  • It was done several centuries before Christ, and was the primary text for Greek-speaking Jews (called the “Diaspora” – the Dispersion) who by-and-large did not return to the land of Israel after being scattered by Babylon and often lost the ability to speak Hebrew (the same way most of the descendants of German immigrants to America do not speak the mother-tongue)
  • This would have been the version of the Scriptures read in the Greek-speaking synagogues (i.e. those in Rome, Galatia, Corinth, and those other places Paul wrote to and beyond)
  • I like to think of the Septuagint as the King James Bible of the ancient world: a translation into the common tongue that is pervasively used by the folk who do not speak (or read) the original language
  • Most of the New Testament (which was written in Greek) quotations of the Old Testament are taken from the Septuagint
  • Moreover, there are many allusions and partial quotations that the NT makes to the OT that are hard to pick up on for someone going from the Hebrew text, but appear as if under a black-light when being compared with the Septuagint (see this example on 1st Peter 3:15 – a text we recently covered on the show)

There’s obviously more depths to plumb on this topic, but I will leave those interested to the links above for now!

Sermon: Luke 19:41-48 (August 4th, 2013)

The Old Testament (Jeremiah 7:1-11), Epistle (Romans 9:30-10:4), and Gospel (Luke 19:41-48) readings for the 10th Sunday after Trinity, followed by Pastor Brown’s homily on our Gospel text at Zion Lutheran, Lahoma, OK.

Sermon 1: Luke 19:41-48 (August 4th, 2013)

As promised (hinted at?) in our most recent episode of the Count It All Joy Show, we are going to attempt to make audio versions* of Pastor’s weekly sermons available here on the website and in the Count Joy section of iTunes, right alongside our podcast. What we’ve done is include the readings for the week as well, as a way of leading into the sermon.  Enjoy!

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